RealClear Radio Hour – Controversies on Campus: Defending Free Speech

2 Mar

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RealClear Radio Hour – Controversies on Campus: Defending Free Speech

February 28, 2015

Marquette University professor John McAdams, whose tenure is threatened as a result of his outspoken politically incorrect blogging, discusses the speech infringements of his experience and across campuses nationwide.

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RealClear Radio Hour – Controversies on Campus: Sex, Lies, and Justice

1 Mar

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RealClear Radio Hour – Controversies on Campus: Sex, Lies, and Justice

February 28, 2015

Harvard professor, feminist, and retired federal judge Nancy Gertner speaks out against overzealous enforcement of Title IX of the Civil Rights Act and the challenge of defining rape and sexual assault due to ambiguities regarding consent, impairment, and differences between the sexes.

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RealClear Radio Hour – Crowdfunding Social Capital

23 Feb

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Crowdfunding Social Capital

February 21, 2015

Dr. Richard Swart of Crowdfund Capital Advisors and Director of Research at the University of California-Berkeley’s Fung Institute, discusses the history of social capital and crowdfunding. Swart recounts the entrepreneurial beginnings of the Jumpstart Our Business Startups (JOBS) Act and makes the case for extending privileges now offered only to officially designated accredited investors—those with $1 million or more to invest.

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RealClear Radio Hour – Measuring Oil in Gold

22 Feb

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Measuring Oil in Gold

February 21, 2015

John Tamny, editor of RealClearMarkets and of Political Economy at Forbes, discusses the challenges of using fiat money as a measurement tool. Tamny explores what oil shocks reveal about the floating dollar by comparing the more stable relationship between oil and gold.

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RealClear Radio Hour – The Libertarian Mind

16 Feb

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The Libertarian Mind

February 14, 2015

David Boaz, Cato Institute Executive Vice President discusses The Libertarian Mind: A Manifesto for Freedom, an update to his classic Libertarianism: A Primer, out this week. Boaz succinctly describes the oft-misunderstood classical liberal philosophy of personal and economic freedom on the rise culturally.

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RealClear Radio Hour – Government Against Itself

15 Feb

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Government Against Itself

February 14, 2015

Daniel DiSalvo, senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute and assistant professor at City College of New York, discusses his recently published Government against Itself: Public Union Power and its Consequences. DiSalvo describes the oft-ignored dichotomy between public unions and traditional democratic values. To illustrate, he points to the $3.2 trillion in unfunded pension liabilities increasingly crowding out government services.

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LISTEN (full-length interview)
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WATCH (on YouTube)

Daily Caller – Obama’s Net-Neutrality Nostalgia for When Things Were Rotten

12 Feb

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Obama’s Net-Neutrality Nostalgia for When Things Were Rotten

By Bill Frezza

“Who owns a telephone?”

It’s a question I frequently ask when I speak on college campuses about impediments to innovation. Every hand goes up, and I get quizzical looks as if I just asked who was wearing clothes.

“Who knows that when I was a kid, it was illegal to own your own telephone?”

A couple of graying professors raise their hands, recalling the days when you had to rent your phone from Ma Bell, the only legal provider.

“Hitchhiking back to college after a weekend break, why did I call my mom, ring the phone three times, and hang up to let her know I got back safely?” More quizzical looks. “Because in 1972 a three-minute long distance call cost the same as two pitchers of beer and three bags of Beer Nuts.”

I have their attention.

From the time my father was born in the 1920s to the time I went to college in the 1970s, the consumer experience of telephone service barely changed. You could have plugged a 1920s telephone into the 1970s telephone network and it would have worked just fine.

Sure, there were a few changes. Long distance operators were replaced by direct dialing. Push-buttons supplanted the old rotary dial. Other than that, the experience of making a telephone call barely changed for 50 years. Fifty years! New features? Hey, the Princess Phone has a lighted dial! As for consumers enjoying a Moore’s Law decline in prices? Fuggedaboudit.

I ask, “How many of you think the smartphone you are carrying is still going to be supported 50 years from now?” They laugh. “How would you like it you weren’t allowed to have new features until everyone on the planet gets a phone?” Eyes roll.

I tell them about a paper that was published in the late 1970s—when I had my first job as an engineer at Bell Laboratories—that explained why you could never send data down a telephone line at a rate faster than 9,600 bits per second. More quizzical looks from generation broadband. You’re putting us on, right?

This is where connecting the past to different possible futures gets interesting.

An entire generation has grown up with no knowledge of what it was like to live under the government sanctioned telecom monopoly known as the Bell System. Today, we have choices unimaginable during that 50-year era. So why did stasis last so long?

The answer is the number one killer of innovation—government-enforced “fairness.”

To read the rest of the column click here.

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